Saturday, October 19, 2019

I Am Alive: Watch Now

It’s been one hell of a long journey to get to this point, and I’m so grateful to anyone who spends some time watching my latest film, I Am Alive.

Time to pull back the curtain and let it all play out.


10 comments:

  1. If there's one thing about your films that strikes me above all else, its their sincerity. Having just graduated among a set of dissertation films I have plenty to say about emotionally manipulative shorts but your work is always so painfully honest. There's a rawness tempered by delicate intent that shines most of all here and while I think overall I prefer Earrings its a superb step up.

    I'm probably going to hit you with a lot of questions rn, feel free to skip any and all.

    Not sure if its off the books but did that abandoned project, 'Ascent', have any bearing on the first chapter of this? Seemed very much like a self-contained episode that could have easily daydreamed into this whole picture, very naturally I might add.

    The multimedia was a nice touch, if a little abruptly abandoned for my taste. I like the idea of embedding real memory, instead of faking it on shoot. Reminded me of the photomontage in GoodFellas. (Side note: Have you ever seen that home-video epic 'As I Was Moving Forward I Occassionally Saw Brief Glimpses of Beauty'? Monster film, very intimate).

    On the subject, do you ever ape other people's images? Lets say out of affection. I snuck a shot from The White Dove into Spider because I love it so much, maybe it was too much in the end. I ask because the shot in the shower (as well as echoing Casino Royale and obviously Shame) reminds me of one of my favourite pieces of blocking ever: The girl in the abandoned shack in au hasard Balthazar. Its such a searing void, seething with emptiness. Cool shot regardless.

    What informed the aspect ratio? The emotional effect reflected through the character is very clear but was there any other reason? Did you just want to try it for the hell of trying? I've been itching to shoot in 4:3 ever since I discovered Angelopoulos a few years back.

    What was the 'final' tracking shot filmed on? I know you're probably going to go into detail on these things in your posts and if you are just shut me up but I just found the application interesting. Its a critical scene but hiring equipment to shoot it alone must be expensive. Same for the hospital- great scene- but how well do you fare when writing a script trying to keep it cheap? Or, do you let the story take you for a ride and reap the reprecussions reading back a great script set in Ancient Tibet on the moon? The economy of creativity in motion is so fascinating.

    Its so weird, I was watching this thinking about emailing you to chat about scripts and ideas because I'm fascinated by your process and any thoughts you'd have on mine, and the short film I think I'm doing next is going to have a technique you've used so well here!

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    1. Mark, thank you so very much for this comment. It’s so thoughtful and engaging, I really appreciate it. You said some very kind words about the sincerity of my work. Thank you for that comment. That’s something I try to be conscious of throughout the entirety of making a film. I’m always pushing for truth, even (or especially) if that means digging through the raw pain and messy shit of real life.

      I’m going to email you about the “inside baseball” stuff. I imagine we’ll have a bit of creative back and forth about your incredible questions (and your upcoming project!) and email is probably the best place for it.

      Thank you so much for taking the time to watch the movie and comment on it so thoughtfully. Email coming soon!

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  2. Thank you for sharing this! I will definitely be making time to watch this week. :)

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    1. Thank YOU for taking the time to watch it! I really appreciate it!

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  3. The burger scene was so devastating, amazing work Alex.

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  4. I like that you deal with real emotions and I'm sure the themes will be just as relevant in 50 years. The way you used those flashbacks was interesting, especially how was not as idyllic as it seemed, or maybe the bad memories overshadowed the good?
    I'm not sure why he has blood on him and I guess open to interpretation, self-harm or outward anger. Made sense though considering his difficult situation. The scene with the pictures in the mail was brutal, and so insensitive of the police. Anyway, thanks for sharing with us and hope you keep making films!

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    1. Thanks so much for this comment, Chris! I really appreciate you taking the time to watch the movie and share your thoughts here. Really happy to hear that you found those flashbacks interesting. Thanks again for the comment!

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  5. I feel like you are getting better and better with each movie you make. That choice to focus on him and not the mother in a hospital scene was so good, the actress portrayed such confusion and heartbreak with her voice alone, not seeing her reaction somehow made the scene more saddening. I like how much was off screen and how many things were left to the imagination. Very few movies these days show restraint and trust the viewer like that

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    1. Wow thank you SO MUCH for this comment, and for watching the movie to begin with! And I so appreciate you linking to the movie and its trailer on your site. Thank you again!

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