Thursday, January 3, 2013

the Directors: Quentin Tarantino


I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again (and again, and again): There is no contemporary director that I am more taken with than Quentin Tarantino. Sure, I get hyped whenever Scorsese, Soderbergh, Haneke, Herzog, McQueen, Burns and the like, have films on the horizon, but there’s something about A Film By Quentin Tarantino that thrills my movie-freaked mind to no end.

Looking over the films he’s done, well, let me just say if you aren’t a fan of Tarantino’s, then this post may fall on deaf ears. I can honestly think of no other director’s body of work that I have given a higher median grade average for. From the onset, QT has never not hit. In my eyes, he is a living master.

My Best Friend’s Birthday (1987)
A worthy short film that was plagued by misfortune when a fire destroyed half of the original negative, now only 36 minutes of Tarantino’s out-and-out comedy remains, and that’s good enough for a taste of what was to be.

Shot in harsh 16mm black and white, the film is, essentially, about a guy who aims to do something nice for his friend’s birthday, but to no avail. The film definitely has the stamp of an amateur, but it’s fun nonetheless. B

Reservoir Dogs (1992)
Having trouble securing funding for a little heist movie he’d written, Tarantino made friends with Mrs. Harvey Keitel in a screenwriting class. She introduced the struggling writer to her husband, who eagerly helped get the film made, and the rest, as they say, is history.

What can I say about Tarantino’s perfect robbery-gone-awry thriller that hasn’t been said before? Perhaps most importantly, and now most obviously, is that the film never actually shows the heist that immediately ruins the lives of all the Dogs involved. We listen, we drop jaws, we look away, we admire, but never do we actually see. I know that point has been picked apart and dissected to death, but it’s an important point all the same. With Reservoir Dogs, Tarantino proved that words could indeed reign supreme. Sure, bitchin’ tunes and a bit of the old ultra violence doesn’t hurt, but more than anything, this is a film that so poignantly captures the art of the written word. Nearly as well as the film that would follow it. A+

Pulp Fiction (1994)
When I was 10 years old, I sat literally stupefied by the marvel that is Pulp Fiction. It was my first of many things: my first Tarantino flick, my first foray into the notion of cursing as an art form, my first discovery of non-linear storytelling – it was, in many ways, the movie that changed movies. (For me, but really for all of contemporary cinema, too).

I’ve long since hailed Pulp as my second favorite film of all time, and while Reservoir Dogs forcefully asserted that writing is an essential art form, Pulp Fiction cemented the notion with vicious gusto. It’s a film so acutely aware of what’s it’s doing (and ultimately, achieving) that to this day, I remain in awe of its command.

One final thing that doesn’t get discussed enough: my general movie tastes are obviously indicative of the fact that I like heavy cinema. I find a certain level of truth in the struggle. That noted, Pulp Fiction is, hands down, the funniest movie I’ve ever seen. And one of the very best, to boot. A+

Four Rooms: “The Man From Hollywood” segment (1995)
It’s New Year’s Eve and a bellhop is coming off of the worst shift of his life. Moments before he musters the courage to quit, the penthouse calls requesting a few items. The bellhop (played to Buster Keaton-esque excellence by Tim Roth) abides, taking a block of wood, a ball of twine, some nails, a hatchet as sharp as the Devil himself, and more to the man from Hollywood resting in the top floor.

The man is famous film director, Chester Rush (Tarantino himself), and what he has in store for his guests and the innocent bellhop is so perfectly… Tarantino. Rapid dialogue, extremely long takes, an angry Bruce Willis… what’s not to like? A-

Jackie Brown (1997)
Whatever movie Quentin Tarantino made directly following Pulp Fiction was always going to have the misfortune of directly following Pulp Fiction. That film is a cultural icon that changed the game. Whether you love it or despise it, its impact is inarguable. Jackie Brown isn’t as significant, but that certainly doesn’t cheapen its worth.

A sprawling, epic heist thriller, Jackie Brown tells the multilayered story of a down-and-out stewardess and how the men in her life all fall under her whimsical spell. What’s great about this film (okay, one thing that’s great about this film) is that you never know what Jackie (played to Oscar-worthy faultlessness by Pam Grier) is thinking. She’s double-crossing her boss, Ordell (Samuel L. Jackson, delivering the finest work of his career), by letting him know that she is double crossing him. She tells an ATF agent (a never-better Michael Keaton), that he’s in on the charade, and she suggests to the bail bondsman that loves her, Max Cherry (Robert Forster, a perfect encapsulation of middle aged despair) that he’ll benefit the most. There’s no question Jackie is running the show, but to who’s advantage? A+

Kill Bill: Vol. 1 (2003)
The revenge flick to end all revenge flicks, Vol. 1 of Tarantino’s epic Kill Bill sets the scene savagely, imploring flashbacks, jump cuts, black and white, anime and damn near every other narrative device you can think off, to tell its tale.

I honestly think the most important distinction to highlight in this film (above its impeccable use of music, its never-ending, ceaselessly thrilling sword fight sequence, and its stirring cinematography) is the fact that it stands as its own film. The original movie was destined to clock in at over four hours, so Harvey Weinstein suggested splitting them up. Normally, this causes the first film to result in a cliffhanger that is better suited on weekly television. And while Tarantino leaves Vol. 1 with the audience gasping for air (not to mention, more more more), it is most definitely it’s own film. Vol. 2 makes it better, but Vol. 1 certainly stands tall on its own. A

Kill Bill: Vol. 2 (2004)
I remember when Vol. 2 came out, and people were pissy about the fact that it didn’t have as much action as its predecessor. And while that’s accurate, it’s not entirely fair. Vol. 2 isn’t a good action film, but it isn’t trying be. Vol. 1 offers up the thrills, whereas Vol. 2 delivers the heart.

Make no mistake, The Bride being buried alive, the trailer park fight, Michael Madsen’s voice – Vol. 2 has its fair share of excitement, but I’ve always considered it one of Tarantino’s more accomplished dramas. The reuniting of The Bride with her thought-to-be-deceased daughter proves to be some of the most emotionally charged scenes the director has ever put on film. Kill Bill as a whole is a kung fu pop masterpiece. Split up, they are a flawless action picture, and a dutifully heavy drama, respectively. A

Death Proof (2007)
In an interview Tarantino gave a few years ago, he said he is obsessed with recycling a familiar film notion, and making his version the best. He cited Death Proof’s grueling and fascinating climatic chase sequence as an example. Car chase sequences are a dime a dozen in films, but QT wanted to make his the best one yet. It’s a tough argument as to if he succeed, but I simply find it impossible to disagree that what Tarantino did during that epic showdown is nothing less than hair raising.

And that’s just one fuckin’ scene of this grindhouse romp. Yeah, I get it, many people (most…?) didn’t dig the Grindhouse shtick upon its initial release. Reasons for that are varied, but I was so taken with what Robert Rodriquez and Tarantino went for from the get-go. Maybe people felt let down (or aggravated) by getting to know a handful of girls through extended conversations (that had nothing whatsoever to do with plot), only to see them all perish. Me? I thought it was ingenious. In the warped, exploitative mind of Quentin Tarantino, no one is safe. Period. A

Inglourious Basterds (2009)
Spanning the globe with a multitude of actors speaking just as many languages, Tarantino’s revisionist World War II flick is a war film of our time. Instead of sandy beaches, QT’s battlefield is a basement pub, where the slight mispronunciation of a word can slowly, painfully cause your demise. Extended scenes of torture are swapped for lengthy conversations about European films and the importance of having your strudel with cream. In short, from its title on down, Inglourious Basterds aims to do things differently. Tarantino has little interest in authenticity; his sole concentration is to entertain.

And, circling back to one of my main points, most clearly since Pulp Fiction, Inglourious Basterds solidifies that screenwriting is an art. You’re never entirely sure where the conversation will go (or if they will go anywhere), but it’s impossible to not take your ears off the spectacle of QT’s verbose manner of speaking. Its first scene enforces my point entirely. The initial curiosity, slowly mixed with unbearable suspense, before finally resulting in ultimate dread, all with the spoken word. That’s saying something. A

Django Unchained (2012)
In all honestly, it’s a little too early to measure Tarantino’s latest against the entirety of his body of work. Many people have asked me if I prefer this slave revenge epic to the retaliation depicted in Inglourious Basterds. My answer: Who knows. Both are bold, new, and simply unforgettable. Is Django Unchained as good as Inglourious Basterds (or Kill Bill, or Jackie Brown or whatever)? I can’t say. What matters is that when you sit down to watch Django Unchained, you are witnessing the birth of something new.

Critics of the film medium often say that film is dead – it’s only comprised of secondhand content. Sadly, they are mostly right. But every once in a while, Quentin Tarantino musters up the courage to step into the arena one more time and give us something fresh. Now, for a guy who makes it so blatantly obvious that he rips from other films, I still feel confident in calling Tarantino’s work it’s own. For better or worse, the man makes his own movies. Djagno Unchained is a perfect case in point. A

In Summation
Masterful
Reservoir Dogs
Pulp Fiction
Jackie Brown

Great
Four Rooms
Kill Bill: Vol. 1
Kill Bill: Vol. 2
Death Proof
Inglourious Basterds
Django Unchained

Good
My Best Friend’s Wedding

Eh
None

Just Plain Bad
None

Previous Director Profiles include:

84 comments:

  1. Wow, this has to be your highest scoring director ever. This makes sense given what you said in the intro. Off the top of my head, here's how I'd grade them:

    Reservoir Dogs - A
    Pulp Fiction - A+
    Four Rooms Segment - B (my mind is a bit fuzzy)
    Jackie Brown - A+
    Kill Bill, Vol. 1 - A-
    Kill Bill, Vol. 2 - A
    Death Proof - B+ (car chase gets an A+)
    Inglorious Basterds - B+

    I still need to see Django, though I'm hearing good things.

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    1. I know man, I just love the hell out of his films. And although we don't agree 100%, it's great that you are an obvious fan as well.

      Also, thanks for posting your grades, I really like when people do that in the comments, gives me a look into your tastes!

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    2. No problem! I'm probably being a little tougher than maybe they deserve on a few because Tarantino's set the standard so high! He's competing against himself at this point.

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    3. Oh I could not agree more with that statement. He's so good, he's making it almost impossible to live up to himself.

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  2. This post is another gem.

    My husband and I were talking about QT last night -- we're actually thinking about taking a crowbar to our wallets and seeing Django Unchained in a theater. ;-) It's rare that BOTH of of are this excited about seeing a movie. We were debating over which of his movies we thought were great.

    I've only seen Reservoir Dogs, Pulp Fiction, Jackie Brown and Inglorious Basterds. I didn't love Reservoir Dogs nearly as much as you did. Otherwise, I agree with everything you've said.

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    1. Thanks :)

      There's a very strong chance that Django will be my second favorite film of the year, so if there was ever a time to crowbar the wallet, this would be it. But obviously I'm a bit biased, as I love QT's films to death.

      Fair enough about Reservoir Dogs. I once heard someone describe that as the most Man's Man movie ever made. It doesn't even have a female speaking part in it. Crazy.

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    2. Huh, I never thought of it as a gender thing, especially since my husband wasn't crazy about it either. But you're right about the absence of female speaking parts. Interesting.

      I think for me, RD suffered from having been seen after PF. RD had some similarities to PF, but it struck me as a much weaker movie. It did have some good moments though.

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    3. Understandable. I saw Dogs after Pulp too, and possibly for that reason, I know I'll never like it more than Pulp Fiction. Glad you were able to take some good things away from it though.

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  3. BTW, I am still in awe of the fact that your parents let you watch Pulp Fiction when you were 10. :-D A decision that obviously paid off since it helped you evolve into a movie buff and film-maker. However I don't envy your mom the conversation she had with you, after the first time you saw PF, about the gimp scene.

    This is classic ... "my first foray into the notion of cursing as an art form." Very apt!

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    1. Ha, aren't my parents just the coolest? It wasn't like one day they were like, "Oh, okay, go watch whatever you want!" It was that, back then, you didn't need an ID or special permission to rent R-rated movies, so I just went to the video store, and rented EVERYTHING. When my parents saw that I couldn't be stopped, they only asked that they sit in on some films and watch them with me. Films that I might be confused by (like Pulp Fiction) or deeply upset by (like... Boyz in the Hood).

      But yeah, there were never any barriers. People don't often believe me when I say this, but even back then, I was telling my friends (and family) about this awesome camera move, or the way a piece of music was used perfectly here, or the way an actor delivered that line there. Little movie mutant prodigy.

      One more thing: something I DID get in trouble with from watching these kinds of movies was cursing in school. When my parents threatened to take the flicks away, I sweetened my mouth up damn quick!

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    2. Hah! It's a good thing my kids don't go to school, huh? You don't even want to know how much my teens curse. I don't mind, as long as they have some sensitivity to where they are and who they're around. "Know your audience." (Sounds like your parents were pretty much the same way.) Anyhow, I have no intention of giving up profanity myself. ;-)

      I've always put some limits on my kids' viewing, but that's because of their particular needs and sensitivities. Every kid is different. As a general rule, I have the highest respect for this: "they only asked that they sit in on some films and watch them with me." Yes! Don't ban ... use it as an opportunity for discussion and growth. I wish more people parented and taught that way.

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    3. My parents were very similar to you, they didn't mind if I cursed, just so long as it wasn't offensive (no racial, gender, or sexual remarks) but everything else was pretty much fair game within the house.

      Every kid is different with their sensitivity, indeed. Very very true. I have a step brother (who's now 17) but when he was a bit younger, he wasn't even allowed to watch PG-13 flicks. He was always curious as to why, and I was like, "Dude, The Dark Knight gave you nightmares, that's why."

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  4. Woah, awesome round up of his movies, I had no idea you like him this much - 3x A+ is a big deal!

    I really like his movies, they are certainly one of a kind which is funny considering how much the man borrows from others (but always with such skill and wit). My favorite of his is definitely PF. The only one I didn't like was Death Proof - just couldn't get into that.

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    1. Oh God, I LOVE Tarantino! No question. And his first three features deserve nothing less, in my eyes.

      A lot of people I know (who really like his movies) couldn't get into Death Proof. That's fair enough, but let me ask you a question: did you see the theatrical version, or the extended version on DVD? Subtle distinctions, but I much preferred the longer version. Just curious! Either way, damn glad you're a fan of QT.

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    2. I saw the one that was in the theater, didn't even know the extended one existed! I will give it a shot next time I'll be watching Planet Terror.

      I really wish they made the movie based on the fake trailer with Nic Cage, btw. That would be awesome :P

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    3. Oh god, some of those fake trailers were just priceless. My favorite was DON'T. Hilarious.

      I'll be curious to hear if you like the extended Death Proof. Hopefully it's not just more of the same dullness to you!

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    4. I usually tend to like extended versions more so I think it may be good ^^ I'll let you know when I see it.

      BTW I really hope we will get extended Django - it's clear there is more material out there, since the trailers had a bunch of stuff that wasn't in the movie.

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    5. You know, I actually don't watch trailers for movies I really want to see, so I'll have to go back and see what they left out of the final movie. Definitely curious there. But I know that I would in no way be opposed to more Django.

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    6. There are some quick things but my favorite shot of Candie didn't make it to the movie :/ I think it's from his first scene - he kisses the hand of that girl who was sipping champagne. it's a small thing, but I thought it was a brilliant shot that really showed how suave and smooth Candie was.

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    7. Just watched it, and you're right, a great little touch there. Shame it didn't make the cut.

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  5. I always enjoy it when you do your director roundups, and it's nice to see your a big fan of QT aswell. I would rate his films:

    Resevoir Dogs: A
    Pulp Fiction: A+
    Jackie Brown: A
    Kill Bill Vol 1: A
    Kill Bill Vol 2: A+
    Death Proof: C
    Inglorious Basterds: A+

    I still haven't seen Django Unchained (or Four rooms, for that matter) but I'm gonna make sure to see it day 1 when it releases in the UK. And I still believe he's made nothing but great films apart from Death Proof, that car chase is still damn good though.

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    1. Wow, thanks so much! Glad you're a fan of the series.

      Thanks for the ratings, we're pretty close in line (I nearly gave Basterds an A+ as well). Not a Death Proof fan, huh? Fair enough.

      Hope you dig Django (but I'm sure you will)!

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  6. Here's my list of the films by Quentin Tarantino ranked.

    Where would you put the screenplays for True Romance, Natural Born Killers, and From Dusk Til' Dawn as well as the CSI episode Grave Danger and the scene he shot in Sin City into the list?

    After all, I have yet to see anything bad that Tarantino has done though My Best Friend's Birthday was OK.

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    1. Nice man, solid list there. In terms of ranking those screenplays... ah, that's tough. True Romance is brilliant, and I love how fun From Dusk Till Dawn is, but NBK isn't really his script, you know? I know he released his own version in print, but what's on screen is mostly Stone's, so who knows.

      Never fully got into CSI, but I did love Grave Danger. That was a superb episode. And his scene in Sin City is perfectly QT. You can just tell he did that.

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  7. Reservoir Dogs - A
    Pulp Fiction - A+
    Jackie Brown - B+
    Kill Bill Vol. 1 - A-
    Kill Bill Vol. 2 - B+
    Deathproof - C+
    Inglourious Basterds - A
    Django Unchained ??

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    1. Bitchin'. Hey, as long as we can all find common ground on Pulp, I'm a happy man.

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  8. Imo, he is the only director, alive or dead, who has yet to produce a movie that I consider less than great (still have to see Birthday, Jackie, Inglorious and Django though).

    My ranking:
    Reservoir Dogs - A+
    Pulp Fiction - A+
    Four Rooms - A-
    Kill Bill, Vol I - A
    Kill Bill, Vol II - A
    Death Proof - A

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    1. Yeah, I completely agree, he's never made a remotely bad film. They're all remarkable.

      I wonder if you'll like Jackie as much as Dogs and Pulp. Either way, you've definitely gotta see that and Basterds/Django.

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  9. This makes me want to finish off his filmography (finally). Haven't seen My Best Friend's Birthday, Four Rooms, or Death Proof yet. That said, I completely agree with the rest of your grades. It's hard to top his first 3 features. :)

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    1. Nice! I love that we agree so much. Pretty bitchin'.

      My Best Friend's Birthday is easily available on YouTube, Four Rooms is on Netflix, and Death Proof is easily his most divisive. Be curious to hear what you think of that one.

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    2. Great! Four Rooms is already in my Instant Queue, and I'll try to see Death Proof soon then.

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  10. Nice !! I will get to Django Unchained some time this week and they just added Four Rooms on Netflix. So, if I can find My Best Friends Birthday somewhere, there is a realistic chance that I can finish his filmography. Then I will get to my Director's piece on him as well. So, for now, I will keep the ratings under the wrap. But you do know that I have Pulp and Bastards in Top 25 All Time right?

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    1. Hey man, My Best Friend's Birthday is easily available on YouTube, and it's only like 36 minutes, so you could be done with his filmography soon!

      I remembered that Pulp was on your Top 25, but didn't know Basterds was. Nice!

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  11. I loved the first three features, then Kill Bill 1 was such a letdown I've not watched anything by him since then (apart from Kill Bill 2, which I liked better than the first film if only because by the time I finally caught up with it I knew not to have high expectations). And I've never bought the "this film is too long, we'd better split it in two" story; the two parts of Kill Bill (which I do think is an excellent title, by the way—two similar-sounding one-syllable words, bluntly imperative, great) are too disparate in their respective overall styles and tones to have worked as a single unit.

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    1. You're definitely not the first person I've heard who has those feelings toward the Kill Bill(s). Obviously, I disagree, but those really seemed to spilt some QT fans. Very interesting.

      Either way, thanks so much for stopping by and commenting!

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    2. Actually I forgot to mention I have also seen Sin City, which I think is a dreadful film, but Tarantino's scene in it is probably the best thing in it. I will give him that.

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    3. Ha, fair enough. That movie hasn't really held up for me over the years, but I am looking forward to the sequel. We shall see.

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  12. Yaaay! I did a QT week in my blog when I finished his films, because he freaking deserves it.

    Well my favourite film of his is Kill Bill Vol. 1, but it was my first Tarantino flick and it *is* infinitely awesome.

    I happen to like Death Proof as well. I think only that, Four Rooms and Vol. 2 are As for me, everything else is an A+ (haven't seen Django Unchained yet *sobs*). And I couldn't finish My Best Friend's Birthday, for the same reason why I haven't watched Aliens 3 yet.

    Awesome post man :D

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    1. Thanks!

      Vol 1 IS infinitely awesome, no doubt! So glad you're such a QT fan. Link your post here if you don't mind, I'd love to read it.

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    2. Wokay- http://beingnormajean.blogspot.in/search/label/QT%20Week

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  13. Reservoir Dogs - A+
    Pulp Fiction - A+
    Four Rooms Segment - B+
    Jackie Brown - A
    Kill Bill, Vol. 1 - A+
    Kill Bill, Vol. 2 - A+
    Death Proof - B+
    Inglorious Basterds - A

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    1. Bitchin', no argument from me!

      Thanks for sharing.

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  14. Quentin Tarantino - A+
    This post - A+

    All I'm sayin'.

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    1. Actually, fuck this, I'm gonna give 'Death Proof' a shoutout, and thoroughly concur with the A-grade you gave it. It saddens me that Tarantino's been convinced that it's his worst film, as I like it way more than 'Kill Bill' (which I adore). I think it's too extreme an encapsulation of his artistic ethos for some.

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    2. Loved your first comment. Shit was awesome. Also... thanks!

      But props to you coming back and standing up for Death Proof. I was shocked when I heard him call that his worst film, but it seems like many would agree. I've always felt it was precisely the film he wanted to make. I really love it.

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  15. For me QT, will always epitomize 90's cinema as a whole, not just independent cinema. His work against the norms of storytelling at the time of his debut told everyone to F the rules, let's do something different and engaging. It was also a sign of the times, what started with Goodfellas un-romanticizing of organized crime, was taken another step by Reservoir Dogs and Pulp Fiction. The 90's cinema became a time to be irreverent and deconstruct to the core what really makes movies work, providing new insight into the art form. I'll always remember Inglorious Bastards as my cypher into his work, it was the first time I was just in awe of the man's bravado and audacity. Not surprisingly, one of the most satisfying movie-going experiences I've ever had.

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    1. Damm Jeff, this has got to be one of the most agreeable, well-versed comments I've ever received on this site. The only thing I can add is that you should really consider developing that paragraph into an essay for your blog. You're onto something poignant and genius there, and I think many people would love to read an expanded analysis. Or at least a would!

      In short, I couldn't agree more. With everything you said.

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    2. Wow, thanks for that response and the accolades, man. Yeah, I'm completely handcuffed with a lot of backloaded reviews for my site that I need to just get done... at some time. Right now I'm juggling with a lot of options in my life so I haven't had a ton of time to sit down and write out some entries. Since you liked the shortened version, I could continue my thoughts with the notion of other 90's films taking this movement of deconstructing themes to great effect. Like Eastwood's Unforgiven unflinchingly graphic unraveling of the Western Myth. Then, capping off the decade, Spielberg's Saving Private Ryan gave everyone a WWII movie that portrayed the battles and emotions of the men as real as any war documentary made, washing away years of por-war gloss. Perhaps I will expand on this in the future... we'll see, again thank you for the kind words.

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    3. Hey man, I completely understand, sometimes blogging has to take a back seat to life. But, again, I think you're really onto something there.

      My pleasure for the kind words, hope you get a chance to write it!

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  16. Great list and I totally agree with everything.

    I surprisingly never heard great things about Jackie Brown, so I couldn't convince myself of it until finally getting around to watching it yesterday. In short- they were wrong. What a great film and a worthy A+ mark.

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    1. Nice man! Like I said, I think Jackie Brown will always have the misfortune of living in the shadow of Pulp Fiction. But either way, I love the hell out of it. Very very smart flick there.

      Thanks for stopping by and commenting!

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  17. Agree with you on most of these, though I really need to revisit Death Proof sometime soon. Any idea where his first film can be seen? Didn't even know that existed!

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    1. Nice. Death Proof seems to be the one that most splits people. But I love it all the same.

      My Best Friend's Birthday is easily available on YouTube, like right here!

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    2. No problem! Hope you enjoy it, it's damn raw. Ha.

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  18. I might be the odd man out here, but I'm actually not a fan of Jackie Brown. In fact, after watching it only once, I've forgotten most of it.

    Having said that, Jackie Brown is the exception. Everything else Tarantino has touched is exceptional or very close to being.
    I rank Pulp Fiction the highest with a 5/5, one of only 14 films so far that I can't see no fault with.
    The rest are very damn close to that level of perfection, but never quite matching it.
    I look forward to watching Django. I think it'll finally happen this weekend!

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    1. You may be the odd man out on the comments of this post, but you're certainly not the first or last person I've heard who does not dig Jackie Brown. Obviously I love it, but I can understand why you don't.

      Actually, the first time I watched Jackie Brown, I didn't like it at all. I had just seen Pulp and Reservoir Dogs, and I didn't think it stood well against those films. My point is that I'd love to hear what you thought of Jackie Brown after rewatching it. Just a thought!

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  19. Perhaps I will give it a shot in the near future. Jackie Brown 2.0
    After all, I'm beginning to think the very same thing happened to me when I watched it. I had just seen Pulp Fiction for the first time and it's just not the same.

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    1. Yeah I mean, that is precisely what happened to me, but at any rate, I can completely get why people don't fully enjoy it. Very very plot heavy, tons of exposition. LOT to take in.

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  20. I thought Death Proof were incredibly boring except for the car chase, but apart from that i love everything Tarantino has done. I really hope he ends up making The Hateful Eight. That sounded like an amazing movie. I really wish i could have been there for the live read.

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    1. Man, I tried so hard to get a ticket to that live read. I could get over the cost, no problem, but the chances of a regular person getting a ticket to that were next to impossible. It sold out so quick, and most everyone there was either press or industry people. Kind of a bummer.

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  21. He was the guy that inspired me to take an interest in film. Awesome work across the board. I would say...

    Reservoir Dogs- A+
    Pulp Fiction- A*
    Jackie Brown- A+
    Kill Bill vol 1- B
    Kill Bill vol 2- B+
    Kill Bill- the whole bloody affair- A+
    Death Proof- B-
    Inglorious Basterds- A*
    Django Unchained- A

    Kill Bill is just so much more weighted and epic as a whole, and I can never decide between Inglorious and Pulp Fiction. Both make my top 10, but Inglorious was just more suited to my tastes. Cant deny the master-work that is Pulp Fiction though. Death Proof was the last one I saw, so a huge step down, but the chase and Mike were awesome. His script for True Romance was excellent too, and though I think Pulp is superior- I love Reservoir Dogs more. I hated it at first, but now its just re-watchable OVER AND OVER. much like a lot of his stuff. The man is a genius. Then again, do love me some Fincher, Scorsese, Kubrick and Malick too. Glad to see our tastes are aligned. Great to talk to someone else with a passion for movies.

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    1. Hell yeah man, I love QT. Pulp is my 2nd favorite film of all time, so it'll always be my favorite QT film. But damn, I love all of his work. Your right, Res Dogs is so rewatchable - I could play that baby on repeat. Likewise True Romance, that script just flies.

      Thanks so much for stopping by and commenting, I really appreciate it. Sorry you had to post your comment twice!

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    2. Yea. Didn't understand the whole blogger thing. It didn't show up and I didn't know it had to be cleared :P Sorry. Pulp Fiction was full of kick-ass scenes, but I'll admit its not any higher for me because it felt a bit- empty. It didn't have the emotional drive I felt in his other work. Hard to explain- still hella fun to watch though and yea, I could watch Dogs on repeat. That and Clockwork Orange.

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    3. A Clockwork Orange is NUTS. Love that one as well.

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    4. Its the movie that got me into deeper meaning in film- all the social commentaries and cinematography. I saw it at about 12, and instantly had to think about it afterwards to fully comprehend it. I had never had that before. Then came 2001 and Thin Red Line and all of that. I owe it most of my love for film. Exploring films like that is just so damn fun now.

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    5. Awesome man, I love hearing stories like that. It's so fun to find out how a film fan actually became a fan of film. We seem to have very similar tastes, which is great. 2001 is in my Top 5 of all time, with The Thin Red Line not too far behind.

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    6. Yea. Not to mention There Will Be Blood. Fight Club is my favourite, but I understand how you and others wouldn't like it. Its really pretentious and the pacing is off after the second act. Despite that, it just has this inexplicable hold over me, like Raging Bull or Se7en. It just grips you. Deliverance is great too, watched it after you recommended it. Find the blog VERY useful for that- thanks again.

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    7. I love Fight Club! And I love to hear that this blog has given you some good movie recommendations. I just read Deliverance for the first time, and it made me love the movie even more. Fucking terrifying, that film.

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    8. Yea. I always thought it would be The Blair Witch Project that got me about the woods. Turns out it was this. The atmosphere- the impressively realistic plot and genuine drama. Its all there- and works much better than the careless baskets of scares modern audiences pine for. Just shows: Quality over quantity- on reflection, what felt at first empty and a little poorly paced became a damn fine and respected horror piece, I can see why you like it so much.

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    9. Deliverance ruined camping for me. My family used to go camping all the time when I was a kid, but after I saw this film, I was never comfortable in the woods again. Since then, I think I've been camping... twice in 10 years. Hated every minute of it. Ha.

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  22. well sorry. Posted twice. Didn't understand and couldn't delete :S

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    1. It's all good man! Yeah, I have it set up so that I have to approve comments on posts more than 15 days old. Helps cut back on spam. But thanks again for stopping by!

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  23. Give a grade for: True Romance(the film/his scipt), Natural Born Killers, From Dusk Till Dawn(his acting/his script/the all film), Sin City(all film/his sceen).

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    1. True Romance:
      the film: A
      his script: A

      Natural Born Killers
      his script: A-

      From Dusk Till Dawn
      his acting: B-
      his script: B+
      the film: B+

      Sin City
      the film: B
      his scene: A-

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  24. Best to Worst films Tarantino directed/wrote?

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    1. Wrote/Directed:
      Pulp Fiction
      Reservoir Dogs
      Jackie Brown
      Inglourious Basterds
      Kill Bill Vol 2
      Django Unchained
      Kill Bill Vol 1
      Death Proof
      Four Rooms

      Wrote:
      True Romance
      Natural Born Killers
      From Dusk Till Dawn

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  25. I love Jackie Brown. This its feels like the least Tarantino film. Because its based on something. Tell me, do you think Out of Sight (movie) its a sequel to Jackie Brown? and which is better?

    I heard that Tarantino will make another two films after The Hateful Eight and then retire. Do you think one of those will be Kill Bill Vol. 3? and if, will be better then 1 and 2?

    What do you think did Tarantino make want to retire?

    If will you become a mainstream, will you make a Tarantinonian film?

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    1. I don't think Out of Sight is a literal sequel to Jackie Brown, but if feels like they exist in the same world. I prefer Jackie Brown, but love them both.

      QT has said that Kill Bill Vol. 3 is essentially dead, so I don't think he'll make it.

      QT wants to retire because he hates the continuing trend of fully digital cinema, and he has said that he only wants to make 10 films total. He doesn't want the quality of his films to suffer with old age (his words), so he'll do 10 and then he'll be done.

      I'd love to make a Tarantinonian film. But I imagine mine would be closer in scope to Reservoir Dogs than anything else. Mainstream or not, I'll always be a fan of "smaller" movies!

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  26. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=644e0h4qyb0&list=UU-tOak37G5g2Xd1Ag-EKEnQ

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    1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LRodrZNAZYs&list=UUYUQQgogVeQY8cMQamhHJcg

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