Sunday, June 30, 2013

Top 10 Unconventional Trilogies

With the wham bang boom of summer blockbusters currently pounding away, studios are praying you’ll fork out $12+ to see whatever remake, sequel, trilogy, reimagining nonsense hits screens on any given Friday. But with this list, I’m attempting to offer something different. There are no Part 2’s or Part 3’s listed below. No prequels or reinterpretations. Instead, these trilogies are connected only by theme, filmmaker and occasionally character. I hope you like my picks, and I know how many more unconventional trilogies there are out there, so please be sure to tell me your favorites.

10. Chan-Wook Park’s Vengeance Trilogy
Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance (2002); Oldboy (2003); Lady Vengeance (2005)
The only linking factor in Chan-Wook Park’s brutal Vengeance Trilogy is just that: vengeance. I know Oldboy is widely regarded as the best of the three (rightfully so), but I’ve always been drawn to the unique vulnerability of Lady Vengeance. It’s vulnerable up to a point, until it isn’t. And when it isn’t… look out.

9. Sergio Leone’s Dollars Trilogy
A Fistful of Dollars (1964); For a Few Dollars More (1965); The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (1966)
Also commonly known as “The Man With No Name Trilogy,” Sergio Leone’s trio of masterful westerns put Clint Eastwood on the map, and cemented themselves as a part of classic cinema. Frankly, I find For a Few Dollars More to be the weakest of the three, but I still consider it one of the finest western films ever made. So, yeah, not too bad. 

8. Lars Von Trier’s Golden Heart Trilogy
Breaking the Waves (1996); The Idiots (1998); Dancer in the Dark (2000)
Lars Von Trier loves breaking his filmography down into trilogies, my favorite being the ironically titled Golden Heart Trilogy. (But look out, if his Nymphomaniac is any good, Von Trier’s Depression Trilogy, now occupied by Antichrist and Melancholia, could take my top spot). Wikipedia describes the Golden Heart Trilogy as a set of films about naïve heroines who maintain their golden hearts despite the tragedies they experience. Fair enough, but that doesn’t nearly make these films sound as devastating as they really are.

7. Godfrey Reggio’s Qatsi Trilogy
Koyaanisqatsi (1982); Powaqqatsi (1988); Naqoyqatsi (2002)
The entirety of Godfrey Reggio’s Qatsi Trilogy lasts 274 minutes. That’s 274 minutes of dialogue-free, narration-free documentary footage that serve as some of the finest visual filmmaking I’ve ever seen. This trilogy may test your patience (although Philip Glass’ breathtaking score helps move things along), but there’s no denying its aesthetic power. I’ve never seen anything like it.

6. Roman Polanski’s Apartment Trilogy 
Repulsion (1965); Rosemary’s Baby (1968); The Tenant (1976)
Repulsion is about a woman driven mad by her own psychosis, Rosemary’s Baby is about a woman driven mad by those who care for her, and The Tenant is about a man driven mad by everyone around him. This results in three of the finest films Polanski ever put on screen. What would it take for Polanski to make a straight-up thriller again? I’d kill to see that.

5. Michelangelo Antonioni’s Alienation Trilogy
L’avventura (1960); La notte (1961); L’eclisse (1962)
I sense a great deal of alienation in the majority of Antonioni’s films, but L’avventura, La notte, L’eclisse are similar in design and execution and thereby fit snuggly into an unconventional trilogy. The highlight for me is L’avventura, a spellbinding, visual marvel of a film that quite literally changed the game.

4. Richard Linklater’s Before Trilogy
Before Sunrise (1995); Before Sunset (2004); Before Midnight (2013)
Perhaps the most blatant trilogy of this list, Richard Linklater’s Before Trilogy is something of a contemporary cinematic marvel. Although Celine (Julie Delpy) and Jesse (Ethan Hawke) occupy nearly all the screentime of these three films, I have never once grown bored of them. I’ve witnessed them talk about any number of things (at great length), but their conversations remain as delightful and honest as ever. Nine years from now, Celine and Jesse will be pushing 50, and I’ll certainly be interested in what they have to say. I only hope Linklater and Co. will be as well.

3. Alejandro González Iñárritu’s Death Trilogy
Amores Perros (2000); 21 Grams (2003); Babel (2006)
I’ll be honest, I’ve never considered Iñárritu’s first three films as a collective trilogy, but in researching this post, it seems as though the Death Trilogy is widely regarded. And given my absolute adoration for each of these films, I couldn’t not include them here.

I go back and forth on my favorite Iñárritu film. I’m drawn to the raw brutality of Amores Perros, the emotional complexity of 21 Grams, and the brutal emotion of Babel. To pick one favorite is damn hard, which is precisely why it’s appropriate to consider all three in the same sentence. As far as I’m concerned, these films are as good as movies get.

2. Krzysztof Kieslowski’s Three Colors Trilogy
Blue (1993); White (1994); Red (1994)
Kieslowski’s Blue changed how I look at movies. Once I saw Juliette Binoche’s tortured performance, my understanding of film was forever altered. It’s one of the best performances I’ve ever seen, period. White lightens things a bit, but never fails to lose Kieslowski’s classic cynicism. Most consider Red to be the trilogy’s masterpiece, and it’s difficult to argue otherwise. The Three Colors Trilogy is, perhaps, the finest filmmaking Kieslowski ever gave us, and that surely is saying something.

1. Ingmar Bergman’s Faith Trilogy
Through a Glass Darkly (1961); Winter Light (1963); The Silence (1963)
There’s a story concerning this trilogy that offers an important lesson. It’s two lessons, actually.

I first watched Through a Glass Darkly on a gorgeous summer day. It was around one in the afternoon and I knew a storm would be coming later. In an effort to capitalize on the good weather, I stopped the film about halfway through, and headed to a nearby pool to enjoy the sun. But something happened. Something wouldn’t go away. A nagging sensation. Something telling me over and over: “You have to go back. You have to know what happens.” I rushed home, started the film from the beginning, and marveled at its ingeniousness. The lesson: you never stop a Bergman in the middle. Never.

Oh, the second lesson. Well, immediately after Through a Glass Darkly, I attempted to watch Winter Light. Couldn’t do it – my mind was still stuck on the first one. Second lesson: only one Bergman a day. Always.


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83 comments:

  1. This is a great list (I never would have thought about this concept which makes it so damn cool) I've only seen the Vengeance, Before, and Three Colors trilogies and I love them all. I agree that Oldboy is the best in the first trilogy, but I would actually claim that Lady Vengeance is the weakest (though, 4/5 in my book is by no means weak lol), and I actually was not the fondest of Three Colors: White too much (not enough Delpy imo) but it was still solid. But to go back to Vengeance for a second, while I see your point about Lady Vengeance perhaps showing the most vulnerability of the three films, I thought that Mr. Vengeance had this genuine air of melancholy that I just fell in love with. Just the onset of tragedy permeates that film and it truly left a mark on me once it finished.
    I definitely need to see the rest of these trilogies though. Although I have not seen them yet, I am very interested in The Human Condition trilogy from Masaki Kobayashi and the BRD Trilogy from Rainer Werner Fassbinder.

    PS. I definitely agree with that second lesson: "Only one Bergman a day." That made me laugh, because, even though I have seen none of the films in this specific trilogy, the few films from Bergman I have seen have definitely left a similar impact on me.

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    1. Thanks man!

      Bottom line with the Vengeance trilogy: while some films may be weaker than others, they're all great. Three Colors: White is the weakest of that bunch for me as well. But I still adore it.

      I'm sure Fassbinder's BRD trilogy would've made the cut here, but I have yet to see all the films there. Soon!

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    2. Oh definitely the entire Vengeance trilogy is awesome, I have nothing but respect for your opinion man, to each his own and Lady Vengeance is still an amazing film. I recently discovered Fassbinder's work so I had the urge to bring him up here. Another set of films I would like to one day see is Takashi Miike's Black Society Trilogy. Those sound pretty interesting imo.

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    3. Ohh I haven't explored the Black Society Trilogy yet. Good call! I may need to look into those as well.

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  2. I love trilogies. In that list, I've seen the entire trilogies from Sergio Leone, Lars von Trier, Chan Wook-Park, Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu, Richard Linklater, and Krzysztof Kieslowski. The only entire trilogy I haven't seen in your list is Bergman's Faith Trilogy as that is something I want to see.

    I've only seen Koyaanisqatsi as I hope to get the trilogy box set very soon. Other gaps include La Notte and The Tenant as the latter I think is going to come out on Criterion soon.

    Another trilogy I want to cite is Sofia Coppola's Lost Young Woman trilogy of The Virgin Suicides/Lost in Translation/Marie Antoinette. It's all about young woman feeling lost and alienated in the world and such.

    I also want to see the BRD Trilogy by Fassbinder as well as I'm already thinking about doing an essay on Christopher Nolan's Dark Knight Trilogy sometime this year. Though I'm still having some writer's block as far as my screenplays are concerned. I still want to conceive my own trilogy that is sort of based on Paul Schrader's Lonely Man quadrilogy of Taxi Driver, American Gigolo, Light Sleeper, and The Walker. I'm calling it the Lonely American Women Trilogy about three different American women living in different continents of the world. The first one I'm still working on is set in Europe. The second one in South America. The third one will be set in Japan. I'm going to do one script at a time and hopefully have it made back to back to back. I already have the three actresses for each film that I'm going to write for.

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    1. I hate to butt in here, but have you seen Hong Sang-soo's In Another Country? It has a similar sort of idea as what your own screenplay sounds like (not trying to be a douche and bring it up). The film itself is alright, very light hearted imo, about 3 French woman coming to Korea in a sort of episodic fashion, all played by Isabelle Huppert.

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    2. I've heard about that film w/ Isabelle Huppert but I haven't seen it. My approach is more to do with a theme that I'm essentially basing well... all of my work which is about alienation but in very different ways and such.

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    3. Void: I had never heard of Sofia's Lost Young Woman trilogy, but that fits perfectly. Love those films. I really hope your prediction is right and her next film is about Hollywood. That'd make for a great trilogy.

      Man, your scripts sound amazing. And it's so cool that you already have the three actresses. Are they friends of yours? Surrounding yourself with people who are interested in various aspects of filmmaking is so key. I need more friends like that, heh.

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    4. Void: Oh I meant no disrespect towards your screenplays, I figured yours would take a darker approach from the way you described them. In Another Country just popped into my head because of your concept. Frankly, I don't doubt that your films would be better than the one I brought up.

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    5. Actually, the scripts I'm writing right now are for the actresses I want for this project. They definitely don't know me but you probably know their names as one them just won an Oscar. Besides, it's going to some time as I'm still having some writer's block and such. I'm just envisioning everything in my head.

      @maskofgojira-No, that's OK. I don't think you were disrespectful. I'm glad you thought of that idea and such. It's just that I'm trying to do something that I'd want to see.

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    6. "I'm trying to do something that I'd want to see."

      And that's what it's all about. If I can offer one piece of advice about screenwriting/filmmaking, it would be to make something YOU want to see. You're the only one who has to live with yourself, and if you aren't proud of what you've done, then you're going to feel like shit. Stick to your vision. Fuck what people say and think.

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    7. If I may butt in, like maskofgojira, I'm not trying to be disrespectful, but I'd also like to bring up a similar sounding trilogy. Ulrich Seidl's Paradise Trilogy: Love, Faith, and Hope. There probably isn't much similarity, but if you need some inspiration, this might help.

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  3. Ooo cool list. Though I haven't seen the last part yet, I am almost certain that my favourite trilogy ever is going to be the Edgar Wright's Blood and Ice Cream Trilogy. That's such a weird link too, but god I love Shaun of the Dead and Hot Fuzz too much.

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    1. Thanks :)

      Ha, that's awesome. I love both of those movies as well. Such a unique brand of humor. Are you pumped for The World's End?

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    2. Most anticipated film of the year. Followed, interestingly, by Before Midnight. I swear, if I had an option to watch any two movies the entire year, these would be it. It's killing me that I haven't seen Before Midnight yet.

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    3. I think you'll adore it. It's so special.

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  4. I have never been able to do this. There are so many great trilogies out there I always find it very difficult, not only to rank them but also to keep myself to 10.

    Except for Qatsi Trilogy, I have seen at least 1 or 2 parts of all the trilogies you mentioned and all three parts of 5. I never knew Inarritu's films constitute a trilogy but now I can see that. Even I think Lady Vengeance is the best of three. Each film has crazy, vulnerable characters looking for revenge at any cost but in my opinion, it is a perfect combination of all those traits.

    If it counts, I think I would have Apu Trilogy somewhere at the very top. Otherwise this is a perfect list.

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    1. Yeah, it was definitely a tough list to narrow down. The more research I did, the more I discovered. But it was a blast to put together, no doubt.

      I'm so unskilled on the works of Satyajit Ray... I really need to fix that ASAP.

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  5. Outstanding list here mate! A collection of truly masterful films that every cinephile should dive right into. Kieslowski is the best, I remember the first time I saw Red, I knew that I had so much to learn about film. Have you ever watched Gus Van Sant's death trilogy, it's one of my favs, I know Van Sant's films are up and down but man, he knows how to tackle the heavy stuff.

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    1. Thanks man! Like Iñárritu’s Death Trilogy, I had no idea Van Sant's Death Trilogy was an actual thing before researching this post. I love those films. They'd come in at number 11 for sure.

      Kieslowski, man, he was just the best.

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  6. I've always kind of considered James Dean's three starring films (East of Eden, Rebel Without a Cause, and Giant) as a trilogy of sorts.
    -Dan

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    1. I suppose that does fit, doesn't it? What's your favorite of the bunch? I think the best Dean performance is Rebel, but my favorite film featuring Dean is Giant.

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  7. To tell you the truth I haven't seen any of them. I plan on banging them out sometime this soon. I'll also be seeing The BRD trilogy soon because I've been really getting into and enjoying Fassbinder's work.

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    1. Yeah I need to finish the BRD trilogy as well. I love falling into Fassbinder's world.

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  8. I've watched 8 Fassbinder's and still haven't seen Ali: Fear Eats the Soul!

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  9. So I've heard, I've been saving it for awhile. Fassbinder's films seem to affect people in different ways and Ali is really the only one I consistently see on people's top 5 lists.

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  10. Another genius list, man. I completely agree with your top two picks, but I might switch #3 and #4. I need to rewatch Inarritu's trilogy, though. The rest of these I haven't completed, so I've got plenty of trilogies to finish.

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    1. Thanks dude. Three and 4 were tough to rank, because they're so different. Pleasure vs. Pain. But I love them both.

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  11. Top two I wholly agree with, Kieslowski and Bergman compliment each other so well. If 'White' wasn't so... out there I would actually put Three Colors at the very top. I would've loved to know if Bergman ever saw either 'Red' or 'Blue' or hell 'Double Life of Veronique' to hear his thoughts on Kieslowski. But yes the 'Faith' trilogy is as stirring a trifecta of works as I've seen. Tells as much about the Human condition on Faith, Family, community and communication as anything in art. I take either Winter light or The Silence as the stand-outs, 'Glass' is great mind you, it is one of the most unique viewing experiences I've had, because I didn't understand what in hell it was about... until the last words. Though I maybe the only one who thinks this, but Kubrick has a sort of 'War' trilogy with 'Paths of Glory' 'Dr. Strangelove' and 'Full Metal Jacket' each showing the utter hypocrisy in different eras of conflict. The glory seeking in WWI, the political rhetoric in the cold war and the vast insanity involved in Vietnam were all put on equal nonsense footing in Kubrick's eyes.

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    1. Man, I need to research if Bergman was a fan of Kieslowski's work. I'd love to hear his thoughts on Kieslowski's films.

      So glad to read your praise for the Faith Trilogy. As good as film can be.

      I love your Kubrick trilogy. I never thought of those films in that way, but that really does fit. Great call.

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  12. Fantastic list. With age and rewatches, I'm warming more and more to Antonioni's Alienation trilogy, which would definitely crack my top three here. Highlight of that one for me is easily L'Eclisse, which is a downright masterpiece, and one of Scorsese's favourite films (you can here him talking about how brilliant it is here, worth a listen: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0d0eFv1vHxo).

    And of course, every other trilogy you've listed here is fantastic. I also like to think of certain usually-consecutive films from some directors' catalogues as personal trilogies, such as Late Spring, Early Summer and Tokyo Story for Ozu.

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    1. Thanks man. I do go back and forth with L’avventura and L'Eclisse as my favorite of that bunch. Great Marty interview there, thanks for sending that link.

      As for Ozu, I was this close to including it, but I am in serious need of a rewatch of all those. Been too long.

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  13. Great list! Love von trier's and two thirds of the Linklater one that I've seen. Really want to give at least Koyaanisqatsi a try and see how I get on with it.

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    1. Thanks Pete! The Qatsi Trilogy will definitely test your patience, so I recommend stretching them out over a few days. Great films, but just so different.

      Thanks for commenting!

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  14. Great list, though I would have loved to have seen Sergio Leone's other loose trilogy (A Fistful of Dynamite, Once Upon a Time in the West, Once Upon a Time in America) on the list - the first film is certainly a bit weaker than the other two, but the other two films are incredible (I'm a big Leone fan). This list reminds me that I need to watch more von Trier and Bergman.

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    1. Thanks man. You know, A Fistful of Dynamite is the only Leone film I have not seen, which seems silly at this point. Need to watch that ASAP.

      One can NEVER watch too much Bergman.

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    2. Oh, if you're going to see that film. Make sure it's under the title Duck, You Sucker!.

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  15. Adding the Three Colors trilogy to my watchlist right now!

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    1. Good stuff. Those are some great films.

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  16. Nice. Good to the Qatsi trilogy on here too. Terry Gilliam's "Dreamer Trilogy" (Time Bandits, Brazil, and The Adventures of Baron Munchausen) is another one worth a mention.

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    1. Ohh the Dreamer Trilogy is a good call (and one I honestly hadn't put together before). When Gilliam is at his best, he really hits.

      Thanks so much for stopping by and commenting!

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  17. Nice list. I've always considered Tarantino's 90s works to form a sort of unofficial trilogy, but I haven't really heard of anyone else thinking so. I think it because they're his only three gangster movies, and also they're the three where his influence from the New Hollywood and Nouvelle Vague movements are most evident, whereas his later works have more of an exploitation feel to them.

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    1. Thanks man. I think your '90s QT trilogy is definitely a fair point. I hadn't thought about those films that way, but it fits just fine. There was a distinct shift in look, tone, and feel from Jackie Brown to Kill Bill. His post-Kill Bill films are much more polished (with much higher budgets, too), whereas the first three have a sort of gritty authenticity to them.

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    2. I'm glad you could see where I'm coming from with that. Also, I'd like to bring up that Michael Haneke has said that his first three films (The Seventh Continent, Benny's Video, and 71 Fragments of a Chronology of Chance) form a "glaciation trilogy", so there's one that I'm sure you considered. Again, nice list, and I look forward to seeing you put forth a thematic trilogy in the future.

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    3. Wow dude, thanks. That was really cool of you to say. I like that thought of Haneke's first three films acting as a trilogy. That reminds me, I need to see 71 Fragments again. Only seen it once.

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    4. A few more I'd like to throw in:

      La Trilogia de Guillermo del Toro: Cronos, La Espinaza del Diablo, y El Labyrinto del Fauno. Okay, now back to English, I'll admit I only really loved one of these films, Pan's Labyrinth, but the other two I enjoyed quite well.

      Refn's Trilogy: Valhalla Rising, Drive, Only God Forgives. Refn's officially stated that One-Eye, The Driver, and Lt. Chang are the same character. An interesting notion regarding three solid films, so hey, why not? Also, I know Only God Forgives came out after this post, so that's probably why it wasn't considered.

      Ray's Apu Trilogy: Admittedly a bit too conventional for this list, but these films are essential not only to shape how one loves cinema, but how to be a human being. Essential viewing for everyone.

      The Evil Dead Trilogy: The pick-and-choose continuity, the batshit insane gore, Bruce Campbell with a chainsaw for a hand. Essential viewing for everyone.

      Carpenter's Apocalypse Trilogy: Say what you will about At the Mouth of Madness and Prince of Darkness, but there's no denying The Thing is a masterpiece of visceral horror.

      Another one from after this post: Damian Chazelle's Music trilogy. I haven't seen Guy and Madeleine on a Park Bench, but Whiplash and La La Land are the kind of movies that define why we go to the movies.

      David Lynch's LA Trilogy: Okay, I'm one of the few who hated Mulholland Dr. just as I'm one of the few who loved Lost Highway and Inland Empire. But I really loved Lost Highway and Inland Empire.

      Ozu's Noriko Trilogy: Late Spring, Tokyo Story, Early Summer. Been meaning to watch Ozu, but I hear these are among his best work. Three family dramas about three different women named Noriko. I guess this isn't a bad place to start.

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    5. GREAT picks all around. Love these. I can't believe I didn't include Lynch's LA Trilogy. That is a fantastic pick right there. Also wasn't aware Refn said that about One-Eye, The Driver, and Lt. Chan. That's a very interesting thought.

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    6. "...the character of One Eye went into Driver then went into the Thai police lieutenant. They're the same character played by three different actors... a mythological creature that has a mysterious past but cannot relate to reality because he's heightened and he's pure fetish." http://www.sbs.com.au/movies/article/2013/07/18/only-god-forgives-nicolas-winding-refn-interview

      Also, admittedly, The LA trilogy is probably the loosest fitting trilogy I had, so I can see why you might not include it. I don't think Lynch himself has ever addressed it, it's just something the fans thought of. It is a compelling thought, though.

      Other trilogies to consider (helpicantstop):

      Bunuel's Search for Truth trilogy: The Milky Way, The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie, and The Pantom of Liberty. I like to call this the Out of Print trilogy because the Criterion releases are all out of print, but I'm perfectly willing to blow 300 dollars to get it. I just need to get 300 dollars to blow first.

      Wong Kar-wai's Days of Being Wild Trilogy: Days of Being Wild, In the Mood For Love, and 2046.

      Lucas Belvaux's Trilogy: This one explores an interesting concept I've always thought about: What if three extremely different genres of storytelling intersected with each other? A thriller, a comedy, and a melodrama with interlocking characters, scenes and plots.

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    7. That is so damn cool. Thanks so much for linking to it. And those new picks are great as well!

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  18. Nicolas Cage's Action Trilogy: The Rock (1996), Con-Air (1997), Face/Off(1997)

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    1. Those aren't unconventional trilogies. Those are legitimate trilogies. Crucial difference there.

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  20. Steven Sodenberg's Ocean Trilogy; George Miller's Mad Max Trilogy; Christopher Nolan's Dark Knight Trilogy; John Lasseter's Toy Story Trilogy; Francis Ford Coppola's The Godfather Trilogy?

    Where are them? What do you think about them?

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    1. I didn't include them because those aren't unconventional trilogies.

      That said, I like them all, though the Toy Story and Mad Max films are just okay to me. I don't like them as much as many others do.

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    2. You know, I just hate Mad Max films. I don't know why they are so overrated. I saw the first one and it was super boring and unrealistic, but some scenes were good. Mad Max 3 was way too over the top for me, I just couldn't watch it. Mad Max II: The Road Warrior was pretty good, still very over the top but still, somehow, funny and thrilling. For me Mad Max D+; The Road Warrior B; Beyond Thunderdome D-. High hopes for the next one.

      Toy Story IS MY FAVORITE ANIMATED FILM. I still like to watch from time to time a animated film, but Toy Story is for me what Cinderella is for you. The Lion King is my second favorite, but this have a shitty trilogy. Toy Story is masterful, funny and smart. Toy Story 2 was better in someways and maybe better at all. Toy Story 3 is a money grab with less logic and intelligence, but still very great. Toy Story A+ or A; Toy Story 2 A or A+; Toy Story 3 B+.

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    3. Very interesting to see your grade for Toy Story 3. I mean, I thought it was good and all, but people FLIPPED over that movie. Just because of that ending? I've seen that same ending 12 times in movies before, so I wasn't moved by it in the slightest. I do love the first one though. The Mad Max films have never done it for me either.

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    4. What about the newest one? Fury Road. I saw it and was entirely unimpressed. Since, I have been oh so very annoyed at all the hyperbolic fervor its generated for itself. I just. don't. get it.

      Its Inception, mark ii
      Again though, nice looking film, at least :P

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    5. I haven't been very public about this, but I'm pretty much in agreement with you on Fury Road. Did nothing for me.

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    6. Wow, I'm happy that I don't uncheck the "Notify me" box. I'm in agreement that the film wasn't more than an entertaining action movie and IT ISN'T THE BEST ACTION FILM OF THE DECADE. FUCK!!! How many people said that?! :[ I like Tom Hardy and Charlize Theron but they weren't amazing, the comedy was silly at best, the romance was corny and the soundtrack was irritable. I still enjoy the fact that they updated the pace making it feel shorter than the previos films but it baffles me how this film is still in Top 250 at #76 and 98% on Rotten Tomatoes. I can make a list why this film isn't great.
      What's your top films of 2015 so far?

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    7. Tough call, hasn't been a very good year so far. I still have a few to see (Mommy, The Tribe, Girlhood), but as of now:

      10. Blackhat
      9. Ex Machina
      8. Trainwreck
      7. The Wolfpack
      6. The Stanford Prison Experiment
      5. Eden
      4. It Follows
      3. Maps to the Stars
      2. Clouds of Sils Maria
      1. Wild Tales

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    8. Damn. Wanna see Wild Tales. Going to see Slow West this week- Fassbender is such a damn fine actor.

      Speaking of which- I NEED to re-watch Shame. If I do though, I guess you gotta see The Ascent huh ;) Deal?

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    9. Fassbender is great in Slow West, but the movie as a whole didn't do much for me.

      GAH! I forgot about The Ascent. I will get to it soon!

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    10. DO IT! :D You wont regret it. If you like that, then Come & See would be a great next step.

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    11. REALLY need to see both of those.

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  21. Martin Scorsese's Crime/Mafia trilogy: Goodfellas, Casino, The Departed
    Quentin Tarantino's (Don't Know) trilogy: Reservoir Dogs, True Romance, Pulp Fiction
    Stanley Kubrick's War trilogy: Paths of Glory, Dr. Strangelove, Full Metal Jacket
    Stanley Kubrick's Future trilogy: Dr. Strangelove, 2001: A Space Odyssey, A Clockwork Orange
    Hiroshi Inagaki's The Samurai trilogy: Musashi Miyamoto, Duel at Ichijoji Temple, Duel at Ganryu Island
    Woody Allen's European trilogy: Vicky Cristina Barcelona, Midnight in Paris, To Rome with Love
    Alfred Hitchcock's Apartament trilogy: Rope, Dial M for Murder, Rear Window
    Sofia Coppola's Depresion trilogy: The Virgin Suicides, Lost in Translation, Somewhere
    Paul Thomas Anderson's (Don't Know) trilogy: There Will Be Blood, The Master, Punch-Drunk Love

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    1. To Rome with Love is one of the worst movies I've ever seen. Easily my least favorite Allen film.

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    2. What do you say about this trilogies?

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    3. I like many of the films you listed. Some are real trilogies, others are unconventional, some are three films placed together based on who directed them.

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    4. Which are three films placed together based on who directed them?

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    5. All the ones you listed by saying "Don't know."

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    6. I know there are trilogies because: in Reservoir Dogs, True Romance and Pulp Fiction are mentioned same characters (Alabama and the Vega brothers), and its the Tarantin univers (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/08/05/quentin-tarantino-universe_n_5649325.html); There Will Be Blood, The Master, Punch-Drunk Love are "centered on man’s spiritual evolution as it relates to the search for love and connection"(http://screenrant.com/paul-thomas-anderson-movie-trilogy-there-will-be-blood-master-punch-drunk-love-video-discussion-analysis/).

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    7. Those are actually really good explanations! I never thought about those three PTA films that way. Very interesting.

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    8. I consider this very solid "Unconventional Trilogies". I thinked a lot about your trilogies and Sergio Leone’s Dollars Trilogy, Richard Linklater’s Before Trilogy and Krzysztof Kieslowski’s Three Colors Trilogy aren't really THAT unconventional. Are great, yes, but are very common choices. You said that you find For a Few Dollars More to be the weakest of the three, but you didn't said about The Tenant to be weak. Three Flavours Cornetto trilogy is another that I love, there very funny. A zombie comedy (or "rom-zom-com") + a buddy cop comedy + a science fiction apocalyptic comedy = the perfect trilogy.

      What other trilogy was close to make the cut?

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    9. I order from best to worst Trilogies I listed.

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    10. Tough call:

      Martin Scorsese's Crime/Mafia trilogy
      Stanley Kubrick's Future trilogy
      Paul Thomas Anderson's (Don't Know) trilogy
      Quentin Tarantino's (Don't Know) trilogy
      Sofia Coppola's Depression trilogy
      Stanley Kubrick's War trilogy
      Alfred Hitchcock's Apartment trilogy
      Hiroshi Inagaki's The Samurai trilogy
      Woody Allen's European trilogy

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  22. lol funny story. I was working on a script and then finally got around to watching Winter Light- and then it WAS Winter Light :')

    Could not possibly hope to compete with that if I ever got it through. Superb film, one of my favorites of his.

    STILL need to see the Three Colours Trilogy! Itching to get my hands on it right now!

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    1. Oh man, that is funny. Had you seen Winter Light before you started writing your script? Three Colors is So. Good.

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    2. :') No. Thats why I was so pissed. I had come up with an idea I was really happy with, and started it- and THEN i saw Winter Light. I was like "ah fuck. Bergman did it."

      Back to the drawing board I guess :P Similar thing happened with Blow-Up

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    3. Dude that's SO bizarre. I'd be so upset if that happened to me!

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    4. Nah it was cool man :') I discovered one of my favorite Bergman movies in the process, and it taught me a valuable lesson:

      do your research

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