Saturday, October 12, 2013

Top 10 Movies that Make Me Cry

When it comes to crying because of movies, I go through phases. For some months (or years), I’ll cry at the simplest of emotions during a film. But then without warning, I’ll hit a dry spell and not cry during anything for years.

So far, 2013 has fared pleasantly in the middle. Moments from Short Term 12 and Upstream Color caused me to get a little emotional, while Fruitvale Station and Captain Phillips had me bawling. Below are 10 films that get tears out of me everytime I watch them. For a nice change of pace, I’ve split the tears into two categories: films that make me cry because of their sadness, and others because of the happiness they evoke.

Please be forewarned that this post contains many spoilers. I hope you enjoy the list, and please do feel free to share the films that get you watery eyed.

Honorable Mention
The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air (1994)
There’s an episode buried deep in the fourth season of The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air called “Papa’s Got a Brand New Excuse,” that is one of the most gut wrenching things I’ve ever seen. Much of The Fresh Prince is built around the fact that Will Smith was left fatherless at a very young age. After Will’s dad ran out on him and his mother, his life was forever altered. In the episode in question, Will’s old man comes back into the mix after being absent for 14 years. They hit it off and make plans to spend the summer together. What happens next is expected, but no less devastating. The scene, which I’ve embedded below, is the finest acting of Will Smith’s career. From the moment his voice cracks at the 1.36 mark, I’m a complete mess.

Sad
Boyz n the Hood (1991)
Late in John Singleton’s urban masterpiece, Boyz n the Hood, college football prospect Ricky (Morris Chestnut) is senselessly gunned down in front of his best friend, Tre (Cuba Gooding, Jr.). The reason Ricky is killed is heartbreakingly trivial, and Tre’s helpless warning, and subsequent reaction, is simply ruinous.

Philadelphia (1993)
In Philadelphia, Tom Hanks’ Andy Beckett brings a wrongful termination suit against the partners of the law firm who just fired him. Andy says he was fired because he is gay and has AIDS, the partners say he was canned due to incompetence. The law partners, led by a vicious Jason Robards, are all incredibly unforgiving. They don’t give a shit that Andy is dying, and want nothing more than to embarrass him in court.

Except Bob Seidman.

Bob Seidman (played by Ron Vawter) is the only partner at the firm who apparently has a conscience. That picture above is Bob on the stand, testifying that he thought Andy had AIDS, and regretting that he never mentioned it to his partners, or Andy himself. After Andy dies, the film closes with the warm reception for Andy in his apartment. There’s Andy’s lover, Miguel (Antonio Banderas), embracing his parents. There’s Andy’s sister, caring to her newborn. Andy’s mom stands complacent but saddened in the middle of the room. And there’s Bob Seidman, having a pleasant conversation with Andy’s older brother.
To me, this scene is director Jonathan Demme proving to his audience that the gay community is one of acceptance. No one at the party is treating Bob with disrespect, no one is gloating that they just nabbed a settlement of millions from Bob’s law firm. Everyone is talking and remembering. Remembering the great man they all lost.

(It’s worth noting that Ron Vawter had AIDS while filming this movie, and died less than four months after the film was released. I didn’t know that before researching this post. Now that scene has so much more weight to it.)

Antwone Fisher (2002)
Antwone Fisher is filled with many gut-wrenching moments, but none hit me harder than Antwone (Derek Luke) literally crying out for help in the middle of his psychiatrist’s office. After embarrassing his doctor (Denzel Washington), the two go behind closed doors and have it out. The doctor screams at Antwone for insubordination and Antwone stands defeated while admitting, “I don’t know what to do,” before exiting the room.

Most of us have been where Antwone is during this scene, but I was actually there at the exact moment when I saw this film for the first time. Because of that, this scene will always knock the wind out of me.

Mystic River (2003)
An animalistic Sean Penn screaming “IS THAT MY DAUGHTER IN THERE?!,” a question he already knows the answer to, will never fail to shake me.

Fruitvale Station (2013)
I was hesitant to include such a recent film on this list, but my first viewing of Fruitvale Station was one of the most intense movie going experiences I’ve ever had. I had no idea the film was based on a true story, and once the film’s epilogue informed me of that, I sat stunned, sobbing, unable to move. This one is still hard to talk about.

Happy
City Lights (1931)
“You can see now?”

“Yes, I can see now.”

Tears of joy.

E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial (1982)
As the cops swarm in to trap Elliot and his friends, the film double jump cuts to Elliot’s horrified face. We cut to a close-up of E.T., who gives an impassioned look of hope. Cut to wide shot of Elliot, E.T. and the rest of the gang as they take off, flying high above the officers waiting for them. And suddenly, I’m a kid again, screaming with joy at the television, tears streaming down my face.

Antwone Fisher (2002)
I’m telling you, this film just kills me. After the bruised and battered Antwone finally reconnects with his real family, including a devastating encounter with his birth mother, he returns to his aunt’s house to find his entire extended family waiting for him. He silently walks through the house before being instructed to sit at the head of the table, directly next to the family’s eldest member. She gently caresses Antwone’s face then, through tears, forces out a heartbreaking, “Welcome.”

Welcome, indeed.

Babel (2006)
This isn’t exactly a “happy” cry, because very few “happy” things occur in Babel, but there’s a scene late in this film that speaks to the best of humanity in the most satisfying way possible.

As a medevac comes in to rescue a nearly dead woman (Cate Blanchett), her husband (Brad Pitt) attempts to give money to the village man (Mohamed Akhzam) who selflessly helped saved the woman’s life. The man thoughtfully denies the money, which leaves Pitt stunned and speechless. Pitt eventually forces out a “Thank you,” which is silenced by Gustavo Santaolalla’s gorgeous track “Endless Flight.” A beautiful and tender moment in a beautiful and haunting film.

Warrior (2011)
The conclusion of this masterful film makes me emotional because it reminds me of my brother. And that’s all I have to say about that.

69 comments:

  1. One I'd have on the happy list is Field of Dreams. I had lost my father a few years before this film came out, and we used to play catch when I was little, so the ending really hit home.

    One I'm not sure which category to put in is Whale Rider. The scene is a sad one, but the film as a whole is uplifting. In either case, when Keisha Castle-Hughes does her speech for her character's grandfather - who has not attended - it gets me every time, and I've seen the film at least four times. Her youngest-by-far-at-the-time Best Actress nomination was well deserved.

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    1. I can't imagine how personal Field of Dreams feels for you. Really sorry you lost your father at all, but especially at such an early age. These movies... they really have a way of speaking to us.

      I love Whale Rider and I love that scene you mentioned. Nails me everytime too.

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  2. Cool idea for a list. Fruitvale Station and City Lights also made me cry. I'll be sure to watch Antwone Fisher at some point before I do my '02 ballot.

    Some of mine: Happy - Argo, The Impossible (also sad), It's a Wonderful Life, Sad - Schindler's List, Empire of the Sun, I Am Legend (the dog scene ruins me)

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    1. Glad you dug the list my friend. Really enjoyed the diversity of your list. Schindler's List... my god. So heartbreaking.

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  3. Great list and an interesting topic.

    I don't cry very easily, but when I do, I do it big. The most recent example was Inarritu's Biutiful. I choked up a little in the beginning when the son and father meet in the forest, but I wept for probably the last 10 minutes straight. I have a personal connection to the subject matter, but it's also just a damn good film.

    This year, I also welled up at Fruitvale Station and Upstream Color but never got past DEFCON5. One of my childhood memories was bawling during the Disney version of Old Yeller. I still wince when a dog dies on screen (i.e. No Country for Old Men).

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    1. Thanks man. Biutiful is a GREAT call. Iñárritu's films always managed to get something heavy out of me. That film never got the attention it deserved.

      I hate cruelty toward animals period, including on the screen. If it has to happen, it better be for a damn good reason. I suppose old Llewelyn has a good one.

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  4. Iron Giant. I can't even hear quotes from that movie without tearing up.

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    1. Ohhh interesting choice. Thanks for sharing.

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  5. I cry in everything, man. Be it Harry Potter or Titanic or The Hours. I cried throughout Amour and for like half an hour after it was over. But hi5! on City Lights.

    Nice list :)

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    1. Ha, you're so cute. Amour was so heavy - I think I was too traumatized to cry.

      "hi5!" I love it.

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  6. I have to admit I haven't seen most of the films on the list. I agree with Mystic River, such a powerful scene. I guess that's the one that got him the Oscar.
    I don't usually cry at films. The only ones that got me were Paulie, when they take the parrot away from the girl and she runs after the car. It hit close to home because I had a parrot I loved when I was little. But the one that really got me was Grave of the Fireflies. I don't know if you've seen it but it's such a powerful piece of filmmaking. It's heartbreaking. I recommend it.
    I also got teary-eyed when I saw La Vita E Bella.

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    1. I haven't seen Paulie or Grave of Fireflies, so now you have me really interested in them. Will check out Fireflies ASAP and report back.

      And yep, I think that scene gave Penn the Oscar edge that year.

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    2. Graves of the fireflies made me cry buckets... If you haven't seen it yet and are planning to see it, then watch it in Japanese with English subtitles. The English dub is atrocious. Also check out Princess Mononoke, I think you would like that one also, it has a beautiful soundtrack.

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    3. Damnit, I still need to check that one out! Thanks for the push, will get on it ASAP. And thanks for recommending the subs. I detest dubbed versions.

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    4. Here is the link ;) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VqzrGcPTuXc

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    5. NICE! Thanks man, will watch ASAP.

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  7. Damn, I see you reference Antwone Fisher a lot on here but now I guess I'll really have to check it out!

    I don't tear up in movies too often, though I did cry at the end of Captain Phillips, there are certain movies, or spots in movies that always get me. Maybe a bit cheesy but I always start bawling once I hear "You'll Be In My Heart" by Phil Collins in Disney's Tarzan. I can't even hear that song without welling up. Other films that I often get choked up watching include the end of Before Sunset, the song right after David Morse is shot in Dancer in the Dark, the shopping scene and final scene in The Hunt, the scene with the brother in Into The Abyss... and probably dozens more. I'm going through a list and this could go on for a while lol. Great list as always man!

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    1. Finally watched Antwone Fisher and I cried twice. That bathroom(?) scene with Denzel where he talks about how everyone always leaves him, FUCK, that was intense and heartbreaking. Then at the end when everyone greets him to and at the dinner table, I cried again. Such a powerful and moving film, Denzel really needs to direct more and Luke needs more work like this. Thanks for the rec!

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    2. First off, great and diverse list of films in your first comment. Very, very interesting.

      I'm so glad this post encouraged you to watch Antwone Fisher. I suppose to the majority of people, it isn't a masterful film or anything, but it is arguably the most personally emotional film (for me specifically) that I've ever seen. Really glad you gave it a chance. That bathroom scene kills me.

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  8. I loved that you gave a shout out to that Fresh Prince episode. It's one of the few "special" sitcom episodes that really worked. It's also been kind of a joke for TV fans when they mention how emotionally powerful that episode was for a sitcom that was normally so light-hearted and often times silly.
    -Dan

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    1. I loved that show as a kid, and when I first saw that episode, I was floored. You don't expect it to "go there" at all. It's something I've never forgotten. Really happy to hear you appreciate it too.

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  9. Very cool list Alex. I have yet to see Antwone Fisher, but since it's place twice here. I may have to seek it out. Really enjoyed Fruitvale Station but did not cry until after the very end when it showed his real life daughter at the end. Great job with putting that scene from The Fresh Prince. I told my self I wasn't going to cry but... aww damn here it comes.

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    1. Thanks Jason. I didn't cry until that scene in Fruitvale as well. I honestly had no idea that it was a true story and then when they showed his daughter, I was just fucking devastated. Sad for Oscar, certainly. Sad for his family. But also sad for the current state of racism in this country.

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  10. That pic from ET is the badly-altered version w/ those stupid walkie-talkies that Spielberg put. What was he thinking when he did that?

    These are good choices but man, that scene in Fresh Prince. That is just devastating and I still think it's Will Smith's best moment as an actor.

    I cry in movies. Some of my favorite films that I've written about I admit to crying to. City Lights is the perfect example of a good movie to cry to. I would also add The Elephant Man as a great tear-jerker.

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    1. I will always respect Spielberg and his intentions, but yes, that walkie talkie business was and remains utter nonsense.

      Really glad to hear you think so highly of that Fresh Prince scene. A real crushing moment.

      The Elephant Man hits me hard as well. When he goes to lay down... oh, god.

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  11. "And that's all I have to say about that." Reminds me of Forrest Gump :)

    Anyway, I agree with one films on your list (I haven't seen a lot of the others). The ending of Philadelphia always gets me... but there's one scene that I consider one of the most gut-wrenching of all time. When he walks out of the lawyer's office after being refused by everyone... that look of hopelessness and being lost... just gets me. Hanks deserved the Oscar.

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    1. It's a good line :)

      I wrote about that Philadelphia scene a few years ago on here. Wow. What a moment. That, in my opinion, is his Oscar moment in the film. His face just reads "What the fuck am I going to do now?"

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  12. City Lights, Man! I am right there. A couple of films that come to mind right away are Finding Neverland and Grave of the Fireflies.

    I haven't seen Neverland in more than 4 years but I have cried every time I have seen it, particularly in the end when Depp and Highmore talk after Winslet's death on the bench. And off course, Grave of the Fireflies. I still don't have the courage enough to watch that film again. I really need to though. Soon.

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    1. So I really need to see this Fireflies movie. I gotta get on it! Neverland is a great pick as well.

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  13. Great list! While I don't have the personal connection to Antwone Fisher that you have, it's very moving. Philadelphia is also a great choice. And I recently saw Babel, on your recommendation, and absolutely loved it. Despite the many sad events in that movie, I didn't find it a "downer," because -- as you said -- there are moments that speak to the best of humanity. In addition to the scene you mentioned, I loved the compassion of the Japanese police detective when the teenage girl offered herself to him in such a heartbreakingly lonely, desperate, vulnerable way.

    I don't often cry in movies, but in recent memory ... hmm ... I remember sobbing like a fool in Oranges and Sunshine. My daughter cried unconsolably after Hachi: A Dog's Tale. Well, seriously ... who can blame her?

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    1. Thanks! So glad you appreciated Babel. I love those ending moments with
      Rinko Kikuchi as well. She should've won the Oscar that year, no question. Ah, kills me everytime.

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  14. Fruitvale Station, man. Felt like someone punched me in the gut at the end of it.

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  15. Lovely list! Oh man, I always cry on movies. That moment in Gravity with Bullock talking to this guy who was transmitting from Earth and her howling to his dogs because she is so alone and desperate for contact had me in tears. I haven't seen Fruitvale Station yet, but I'm certain I'm gonna be a mess. The most I cried during a movie, though, is Brokeback Mountain when Ennis finds the shirt in Jack's room. Jesus.

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    1. Thanks! That scene from Brokeback almost made the cut here. It kills me to watch the way Ledger plays that scene. What a tremendous talent he was.

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  16. My best friend and I were devotees of Fresh Prince of Bel Air. We watched it every Monday back in those prehistoric pre-DVR days when you had to actually watch it when it aired. Christ, man, I hadn't thought about that episode in years but watching that clip makes it seem like yesterday. Thank you for making me remember it. I honestly don't know if I ever would have otherwise.

    I like that you break this list down into happy/sad since they are such different things but what I like most is when those two sensations collide. Like the movie is so sad but still the movie itself is of such high quality that both sensations drive you to tears. I had that happen to me with Ain't Them Bodies Saints this year. That's what happened to me with Atonement and that's what happened to me with Million Dollar Baby. I know you love that movie too so I don't mind confessing.....I remember it ending and knowing that I couldn't cry in the theater because it wasn't just going to be mere crying. And so I held it together until I got to my car and then I just collapsed into a sobbing nervous breakdown. I think I sat there for ten minutes. It was awesome.

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    1. I was the same exact way with the Fresh Prince. Loved the hell out of that show. Glad that clip could take you back a ways.

      What happened to you with Million Dollar Baby is what happened to me with Fruitvale station. And when I finally pulled myself together, I realized I hadn't cried like that in literal years. So intense. Million Dollar Baby always nails me too. I'm gutted by the brief moment in the hospital, when Swank's nose is broken and she gets called back by the nurse. Eastwood stands up and says "I'll be right here." Fuck man.

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  17. Great Fresh Prince clip and great to see Boyz in there too. United 93 is a terrible one for me. No matter how many times I've seen it.

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    1. Ohh United 93 rips me apart too, everytime. Such a visceral experience.

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  18. I really don't cry too much watching movies, but the one that got me last year was Grave of the Fireflies. The girl in that film is just a year older than our daughter was at the time, and the similarities were just too much. A brilliant, but brutal film.

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    1. Wow, third Fireflies pick here. I need to see that one A.S.A.P. Thanks Dan!

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  19. The Elephant Man. I'm practically bawling from start to finish.

    Also, the final charge in Glory, and Schindler's List. That's all I can think of off the top of my head.

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    1. The Elephant Man gets me too. So heartbreaking. Schindler's List as well.

      Thanks so much for stopping by and commenting!

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  20. Whoa I obviously skipped that episode of Fresh Prince of Bel Air. I did not know that his father left him. Will Smith showed potential and that is one deep scene.

    I haven't watched anything from your list aside E.T and Warrior. Didn't cry wathing E.T, probably will if I'm still a kid. But my face was practically all wet watching Warrior, ahah. I cried watching A Separation too. I rarely cry watching a movie, so when I do it made me respect the movie.

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    1. A Separation is a great pick. That was a very, very good film. Isn't that Fresh Prince moment so intense?

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  21. Every GOOD comedy sitcom needs to have that one moment that will break you down. Loved that you picked out that moment from Fresh Prince. For fear of breaking down in tears at work, I didn't watch it again. Scrubs managed to do that with the Brendan Fraser arc... I'll say no more!

    I cry at the drop of a hat in films. Think one recent-ish film that had me really bawling like a baby was Senna. I don't know whether it was a mixture of memories of watching his last F1 race, or just the fact that it was all so well done in the film, it really, really got to me.

    If I gave you a list of films I have cried in (happy and sad), it'd be incredibly long!

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    1. Ahh Senna was a good one. I quite enjoyed that doc. And I agree, if a sitcom can pull off a really heavy moment like that one in Fresh Prince, then it is doing something very, very right.

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  22. Wonderful list, Alex! I actually love when others admit to crying at the movies, it makes me feel a little less embarrassed about it. I swear being pregnant and becoming a parent permanently messed with my hormones because now I cry in just about anything. I recently watched The Impossible and I cried throughout the whole thing. I cry at the end of My Girl every time. Hell, I even cried watching Malala Yousafzai's interview on The Daily Show last week. That was so powerful. (and I'm such a wuss)

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    1. Thanks! I've heard that becoming a parent can make people more sensitive and emotional to particular things. And there's certainly nothing wrong with that! The Impossible was a definite tearjerker. Watts just crushed me in that one.

      Thanks so much for the comment!

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  23. Very nice list. I loved your inclusion of "that" episode of the Fresh Prince. I remember watching it when I was younger and it's one of the few things that really stuck in my mind from the series. A tender moment made all the more tender because it was unexpected for the show to take that route.

    I can't say enough about the ending of City Lights. It's effective every time. Probably the single most magical moment in cinema up to that point.
    I also love the scene in Warrior when the two brothers embrace. It's made all the more powerful by how gruesome and heartbreaking the fight was. It's a moment of true reconciliation that captures everything the film was leading towards.
    I can't speak of tearjerkers without referring to three scenes in particular. One being towards the end of Schindler's List when he weeps in agony finally recognizing how awful it has all been. I can't stand listening to him saying: "I could have done more" One of the finest moments in the last 25 years of film.
    Another one is more recent and it happens every time I watch the documentary Senna. In a recent post I talk about it in more detail, but lets just say it reminds me of watching him as a little kid (he was my first idol, if I could say such a thing about anyone) and reminds me of watching the races with my father (who passed away 3 years ago).
    The most heartbreaking moment for me comes courtesy of "Life is Beautiful", which falls as one of my top 10 films ever. I connected with the story in so many levels, and I can't tell you how deeply sad I was to find out with certainty that Guido sacrificed his life to save his son. There's nothing more powerful than the bond between parents and their children, and this film captured it to perfection.
    The film is so powerful to me that I've refused to watch all of it again. I could only stomach it once and it was beautiful.

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    1. Hey man, really happy to hear that you like the list. I also really appreciate that you value that Fresh Prince episode.

      That moment in Schindler's List... oh god. Devastating.

      That is a very heartbreaking moment in Life is Beautiful. Very powerful indeed.

      Loved all your picks and your comments on mine. Thanks so much for the comment.

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  24. Great choices all, but that Fresh Prince one is inspired. Nice pick.

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    1. Thanks man. That episode just kills me.

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  25. I remember the first time I saw City Lights, when that ending came on, I was maybe 17, my dad had watched the film with me, the tears welled up and I looked at him and he nodded, tears streaming back. My father is the reason I'm so invested in cinema and I thank him for sharing Chaplin's film and that moment with me. I have a bunch that really set me off, Raging Bull, especially when Jake starts wailing on the wall. The Iron Giant ever since I was a kid. I've always been a big animation nerd, that said, Macross Do You Remember Love? gets me downright weeping in it's depiction of both the fragility and the strength of mankind divided and united respectively. When Lynn Minmay belts out one last saccharine pop tune, bombarded by flashing lights, it's over, Light's Out, ten count.

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    1. Love that story about you and your dad. It's moments like that that help make films so memorable for us.

      I've never seen Macross, but you've made me want to check it out ASAP. Sounds really moving.

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  26. Has an animated movie ever made you cry?

    I teared up the first time I watched Spirited Away.

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    1. I think the opening sequence of Up is the closest I've come to crying in an animated film. And Cinderella, obviously.

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  27. As far as I know, It's A Wonderful Life is the only film to make me cry happy tears. But a few that made me cry sad ones are Captain Phillips (the final 10 minutes get to me), 12 Years A Slave, Marley and Me, Requiem For A Dream, and Up (the opening sequence is just heart wrenching).

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    1. Captain Phillips... holy hell, that scene really shook me up. I've been wanting to write an essay about it, but it might actually be too personal, I don't know. Whatta scene.

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  28. Glad to see the Antowne Fisher lover. It's a criminally overlooked film. Been enjoying your blog awhile and just realized we're Letterboxd co-followers! I'm Sabotage over there.

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    1. Cool man - thanks so much for stopping by! Antwone Fisher... man, that one still guts me. I saw that movie at a very influential time in my life. It really helped put things into perspective for me. I love it.

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  29. Even though I don't necessarily 'CRY' cry when watching a film, there are films that at least have me either crying small tears or on the verge of tears. A few examples include E.T., Requiem For A Dream, Schindler's List, Up, and Dancer in the Dark. But one more recent film that also has me choked up when I think about it is Starred Up. Mainly because of the final scene where Neville comforts Eric after he saves him from being lynched. Very powerful scene.

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    1. Fuckin' hell, that final scene of Starred Up was so emotive. Really good call there. What a film. Dancer in the Dark as well, that one really knocked the wind out of me. So so powerful.

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  30. Now, do a Top 10 Movies that Make Me Happy (or Laugh).

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  31. Not a one. Only children cry over movies. I know what you're thinking, "Yea. Got some hard bark on her." (grin)

    b

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    1. I go in waves. Sometimes I'll cry easily in movies, other times I'll go months and months without shedding a tear. Definitely don't think only kids cry in flicks though.

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  32. Wait. Bresson's "Au Hazard Balthazar." (sniffle)

    b

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